“It’s between frames where cinema speaks.” -Peter Kubelka, 1967

“Hollywood,” sometimes known as “the dream factory,” makes ritualistic-dramas in celebration of mass memory–very like the rituals of tribal people […] But the amateur photographs the persons, places, and objects of his love and the events of his happiness and personal importance in a gesture that can act directly and solely according to the needs of memory.[…] He is free, if he but accept the responsibility of his freedom, to work as the spirit of his god, or his memory, or his particular needs, move him. It is for this reason that I believe any art of the cinema must inevitably arise from the amateur, “home-movie” making medium.” – Stan Brakhage

Information Exchange vs Communication

I was recently talking with friends about our mutual reluctance to share big life news on facebook. People want to know this news, they sometimes feel offended if they discover that an important event has occurred and they haven’t heard – but the efficiency of communicating with everyone at once doesn’t feel appropriate for certain types of personal information. Of course there…

Hygge

… is a Danish word meaning some combination of cozy, open and welcoming, useful qualities for surviving a long winter. I think somehow relates to the idea of Boredom as a positive quality, discussed in the previous post, and makes me hopeful that Minnesota could be a pioneer in the world of slow art and film making.

On Boredom

Boredom is the dream bird that hatches the egg of experience. A rustling in the leaves drives him away. His nesting places–the activities that are intimately associated with boredom–are already extinct in the cities and are declining in the country as well. With this the gift for listening is lost and the community of listeners disappears. For storytelling is always…

Desktop Documentary

It’s not everyday that an entirely new genre of media-making comes along, but this effort is pretty exciting: Desktop documentary is an emerging form of filmmaking developed at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago by faculty artists such as Nick Briz, Jon Satrom and Jon Cates, and students such as myself [Kevin B. Lee], Yuan Zheng and Blair Bogin.…

One in Ten

This article in the Washington Post is mostly about white privilege in the art world, but contains a number of salient statistics and links, including the unsuprising figure that: Art schools, as it happens, are also anything but a bridge to gainful employment in the art world: only one out of every 10 art school graduates goes on to earn his or…

Death on Screen

A young writer over at The Onion AV Club describes how the real death of a loved one has ruined most movie-death for him, at least temporarily: For Abrams and his writers, death is little more than a screenwriter’s tool to evoke emotion, and that cavalier attitude toward one of the universal human experiences makes everything about his film feel hollow.…

Age of Loneliness

Via the Guardian: One of the tragic outcomes of loneliness is that people turn to their televisions for consolation: two-fifths of older people report that the one-eyed god is their principal company. This self-medication aggravates the disease. […] Aspiration, which increases with income, ensures that the point of arrival, of sustained satisfaction, retreats before us. The researchers found that those who…

Must See TV

I’m taking a break from television. For a couple of reasons. I just finished re-watching The Sopranos – all of it, six seasons worth, which works out to roughly 70 hours of television. It’s so good, really a great artistic achievement. And, also, a 70-hour investment. I came late to the brilliance of our generation’s television – I watched a lot…

Big Data and Faith

Finally, secular progressives have something they can believe in. Because Gaia is just too new-agey and earth-mothery for most of us, meditating at the Zen center is actually hard work, Christianity is too darn patriarchal, the outer space adventures are over, and messing around with genetics is actually more terrifying than anything else. Thank goodness for Big Data, coming along…